How blended learning will change teaching

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If you work in education, you may have gone a day without someone telling you that ‘blended learning’ is the future. But it was probably your day off.

Many are convinced that this new approach will be the way that we use technology to alter the 19th century model of a shared timetable and a shared workspace. But is all that change for the benefit of the pupils? Where does it leave the teacher? This, from Digital Learning Now, gives some insight into the changes and challenges ahead for the teaching profession.

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Jimmy Leach is a digital consultant, working with clients in the UK, USA and UAE. And places which spell out their names properly too.

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3 Comments

  1. Stephan Hughes

    June 27, 2014 at 6:42 pm

    One point got my attention: how exactly does BL bring about more earning power for teachers?

    • Plamen

      July 5, 2014 at 1:19 pm

      I am with Stephan on this one. Online teaching (hybrid learning employees the same, if not similar, technology and pedagogy as online)is estimated to require about 1 and 1/2 the time to prepare compared to F2F teaching. I learned this at a conference around year 2000 and that was the last time I heard being openly discussed that the in order to provide sound online (and hybrid) education, the instructor must be compensated accordingly. The reality is that administration views online education as a milk cow and hybrid/online education respectively becomes a way to herd more students per instructor and make more money, rather than to achieve the goals very well presented on this infographic.

  2. Lesley Renwick

    July 1, 2014 at 6:51 am

    Blended learning = sustainable higher pay? Never going to happen. State education funding is being cut to the quick – all over the world. Senior education managers are looking to reduce pay to manage ever shrinking budgets. Blended learning to them means – develop some technology based resources, bring the teachers into classroom part time and the rest of the education will be done on-line (because the kids love being on-line don’t they?). Teachers pay – only for direct contact hours (.e. the time they are in the classroom)

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